Maryland

Restoration of Rights Project – Maryland Profile

Guide to restoration of rights, pardon, sealing & expungement following a Maryland criminal conviction

Final Report of the Collateral Consequences Workgroup

Report of workgroup charged by Governor Hogan and the 2016 Justice Reinvestment Act with investigating and making recommendations for reform of Maryland collateral consequences (2016)

The Collateral Consequences of Arrests and Convictions under D.C., Maryland, and Virginia Law

By the Washington Lawyer’s Committee for Civil Rights & Urban Affairs (2014)

Collateral Consequences of Criminal Convictions in Maryland 

Reentry of Ex-Offenders Clinic, University of Maryland School of Law (2007)

 

 


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Related blog posts:

  • New research report: Four Years of Second Chance Reforms, 2013-2016 (2/8/2017) - Introduction Since 2013, almost every state has taken at least some steps to chip away at the negative effects of a criminal record on an individual’s ability to earn a living, access housing, education and public benefits, and otherwise fully participate in civil society.  It has not been an easy task, in part because of the volume and complexity of [...]
  • New era for expungement reform? Too soon to tell. (8/3/2016) - A new article in the Harvard Law & Policy Review evaluates some of the recent legislative efforts to deliver relief from the burden of collateral consequences through new or expanded expungement laws.  In “A New Era for Expungement Law Reform? Recent Developments at the State and Federal Levels,” Brian Murray argues that many of the newer record-closing laws are far too modest in [...]
  • Expungement expansion round-up (2016 edition) (5/23/2016) - More and more states are enacting new expungement and sealing laws, or expanding existing ones, some covering convictions for the first time.  The first four months of 2016 alone saw courts given significant new authority to limit access to criminal records in four states, and bills have been introduced in several others that promise more new laws in months to [...]
  • Why shouldn’t everybody with a felony conviction be allowed to vote? (6/1/2015) - The editors of the New York Times are critical of Maryland Governor Larry Hogan’s recent veto of a law that would have allowed anyone with a felony conviction to vote if they are living in the free community.  See “A Bad Voting Ban,” June 1, 2015.  Maryland’s law now disenfranchises anyone convicted of a “felony and . . . actually [...]
  • New Maryland law allows “shielding” of some misdemeanor convictions (5/28/2015) - Earlier this month, Maryland governor Larry Hogan signed the Second Chance Act of 2015, 2015 Md. Laws 313 (HB 244), which allows eligible persons to petition a court for “shielding” (or sealing) certain misdemeanor records.  This is the first time Maryland has authorized limits on public access to conviction records other than nuisance offenses and offenses that have been pardoned. [...]
  • State courts question mandatory lifetime sex offender registration (1/4/2015) - Notwithstanding the Supreme Court’s decisions in Connecticut Department of Public Safety v. Doe, 538 U.S. 1 (2003) and Smith v. Doe, 538 U.S. 84 (2003), state courts are coming to different conclusions under their own constitutions about whether sex offender registration and notification laws constitute punishment for purposes of due process and ex post facto analysis.  The Pennsylvania Supreme Court is the most recent [...]
  • How risky is pardoning? Not as risky as committing uninformed journalism (12/15/2014) - An AP story about the perils of pardoning, picked up by newspapers and media outlets across the country, manages to convey three pieces of misinformation in its very first sentence.  Riffing off a recent high profile pardon application, it begins like this:  “Mark Wahlberg’s plea for a pardon has focused fresh attention on excusing criminal acts – something governors rarely do [...]
  • Washington Lawyers Committee releases report on collateral consequences in D.C., Maryland and Virginia (10/23/2014) - On October 22 the Washington Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs released a report focusing on the problem of collateral consequences in the DC tri-jurisdiction region. The report, a follow-up to an earlier WLC report on racial disparity in arrests in the District of Columbia, documents the disproportionate impact of collateral consequences on minorities, which makes them “very [...]
  • Gubernatorial candidate brings clemency issues to forefront of Maryland race (10/22/2014) - Larry Hogan, Republican candidate in the Maryland gubernatorial race, criticized current governor Martin O’Malley’s sparing use of executive clemency and pardon power. As reported in the Washington Post: Republican Larry Hogan says a governor’s authority to commute sentences and pardon prisoners is an important power that he would rejuvenate if he is elected governor. Hogan spoke in an interview with [...]