Kentucky

Restoration of Rights Project – Kentucky Profile

Guide to restoration of rights, pardon, sealing & expungement following a Kentucky criminal conviction

Collateral Consequences of Felony Convictions Established in the Kentucky Administrative Regulations

Sara M. Caudill and Ashley England-Huff, 35 N. Ky. L. Rev. 453 (2008)

Kentucky’s Statutory Collateral Consequences from Felony Convictions: A Practitioner’s Guide

Troy B. Daniels, Dawn L. Danley-Nichols, Kate R. Morgan and Bryce C. Roades, 35 N. Ky. L. Rev. 413 (2008)

 

 


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Related blog posts:

  • New research report: Four Years of Second Chance Reforms, 2013-2016 (2/8/2017) - Introduction Since 2013, almost every state has taken at least some steps to chip away at the negative effects of a criminal record on an individual’s ability to earn a living, access housing, education and public benefits, and otherwise fully participate in civil society.  It has not been an easy task, in part because of the volume and complexity of [...]
  • Excessive filing fees frustrate new expungement schemes (6/3/2016) - How much is a clean slate worth?  That’s the question many people with criminal records are asking in Kentucky, Louisiana, and Tennessee, where the cost of filing for expungement is (or will soon be) between $450 and $550.  To put that into perspective:  In Kentucky, the $500 fee required to expunge an eligible felony conviction under a new law that [...]
  • Expungement expansion round-up (2016 edition) (5/23/2016) - More and more states are enacting new expungement and sealing laws, or expanding existing ones, some covering convictions for the first time.  The first four months of 2016 alone saw courts given significant new authority to limit access to criminal records in four states, and bills have been introduced in several others that promise more new laws in months to [...]
  • Kentucky expungement offers fresh start to thousands (4/15/2016) -   On Wednesday Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin signed a bill giving state courts authority for the first time to expunge felony convictions.  The new law, HB 40, allows people convicted of specified non-violent class D felonies who have been crime-free for 5 years to petition to have their conviction vacated, charges dismissed, and record expunged.  Expunged records are deleted from [...]
  • Outgoing Kentucky governor issues order restoring voting rights (11/24/2015) - UPDATE: Governor Matt Bevin rescinded Governor Beshear’s order on December 22, 2015, saying: While I have been a vocal supporter of the restoration of rights, it is an issue that must be addressed through the legislature and by the will of the people. Governor Bevins went on to sign a major felony expungement bill in April of 2016 that gives [...]